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The rights of Tribal Sovereign Nations and our shared climate and environment are in jeopardy today because of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau—and I’m asking you to join me in taking a stand.

When President Donald Trump was elected, the world looked to Trudeau to be a strong progressive voice and leader. Instead, he’s close to selling out our environment—and First Nations communities—to give government assistance to Texas-based company Kinder Morgan (formerly Enron Liquid Pipelines) to build the Trans Mountain Pipeline. This would be the biggest tar sands pipeline on earth, shipping 890,000 barrels of oil from Alberta to the coast per day—the equivalent of 34 million new cars on the road every year.

I expected this of Trump, but from Trudeau, it feels like betrayal. He knows as well as we do that we’re in a climate crisis, and we all stand to lose big—especially First Nations people. Big polluters have called the shots for decades while indigenous communities, low-income communities, climate scientists and environmental activists have been shut out of or, at best, held at arm’s length while our elected officials cater to Big Oil and Gas and their shareholders’ profits.

It’s not too late to hold Trudeau to account before he makes a huge mistake. Show your solidarity with the First Nations and our Canadian neighbors fighting their Parliament to stop the Trans Mountain Pipeline—sign the petition.

The United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People would be torn apart with Trudeau’s approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline. Our environment is at its breaking point, and no one knows this better than the First Nations in Canada, and Native American communities like the Tulalip Tribes of Washington state, of which I am a part.

I know we can do this. Together, we’ve taken stands to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, Keystone XL, and countless other pipelines that threaten our land and water. Over 250,000 of us signed the #NoDAPL petition, and we raised more than $200,000 for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. We have the power to do it again, and stop the Trans Mountain Pipeline if enough of us take action right now.

Will you add your name to the petition opposing the Trans Mountain Pipeline in solidarity with thousands of Canadian and First Nations people standing up to Big Oil and Gas and a government that is putting profits before people?

Image result for tar sands images

No Tar Sands

Center for Biological Diversity

There is no big money or benevolent corporation coming to save us. We have to be the change, and change is the only thing that can save our planet from the greed and recklessness of the fossil fuel lobby. Please join me, and my dear friends in Canada, in raising your voice in solidarity with the rising international chorus for environmental justice today.

t’igwicid—thank you!

Deborah Parker is a member of the Tulalip Tribe, as well as
Co-Vice Board Chair of Our Revolution

One Comment

  1. Sally Dugman says:

    I plan to send this information to a large number of people who I know, including Native Americans from several tribes. And I’m going to request that they run with it like a wild wind to send it far and widely to others.

    Enron Liquid Pipeline … Do you want to learn about that foul Texas, USA company, which got a new name and that will help this abomination be built if it is built? Here you go:

    Enron scandal – Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron_scandal
    The Enron scandal, publicized in October 2001, eventually led to the bankruptcy of the Enron Corporation, an American energy company based in Houston, Texas, and the de facto dissolution of Arthur Andersen, which was one of the five largest audit and accountancy partnerships in the world. In addition to being the …

    ‎Enron scandal · ‎MCI Inc. · ‎Andrew Fastow · ‎Rebecca Mark-Jusbasche
    Enron Scandal: The Fall of a Wall Street Darling | Investopedia
    https://www.investopedia.com/updates/enron-scandal-summary/
    Jan 3, 2018 – The story of Enron Corp. is the story of a company that reached dramatic heights, only to face a dizzying fall. Its collapse affected thousands of employees and shook Wall Street to its core. At Enron’s peak, its shares were worth $90.75; when it declared bankruptcy on December 2, 2001, they were trading at …
    ‎Mark To Market · ‎SPV/SPE · ‎Dotcom Bubble · ‎Lehman Brothers