There are no breaking news at the moment

Following the renaissance epoch of Bengali vocal music between 1900-1950, established by key creative figures such as Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), Dwijendralal Roy (1863-1913), Rajanikanta Sen (1865-1910), Atul Prasad Sen (1871-1934) and Kazi Nazrul Islam (1899-1976), five compositional geniuses who blazed their trails into musical history, and to whom Bengal’s musical heritage owes its identity to this day–there occurred an expected vacuum in the early post-renaissance period (described in the literary domain as the Kallol Yuga), especially since the passing of Tagore in 1941. Interestingly, however, there then appeared in the musical horizon a significant number of fresh creative figures (who stand apart from the long-standing purely classical vocal traditions in Bengal and India) between the late 1940s and continuing through the 1960s. To many of us growing up in Bengal (primarily in Calcutta, now Kolkata) in the 1960s and ’70s, modern Bengali music was an absolute storehouse of melodic treats, populated by extraordinarily talented artists and composers, even a short listing and discussion of whose work would easily fill several chapters in a book.

The major post-renaissance follow-up in the 1940s-’60s time frame was crowded with absolutely incandescent figures both by way of vocalists as well as lyricists and composers. To cite only a minuscule fraction (note that much of the current musical efforts across Bengal frequently play off of the timeless creations generated by this epoch), we have Pankaj Kumar Mullick, Sachin Dev Burman, Hemanta Mukhopadhyay, Manna Dey, Shyamal Mitra, Manabendra Mukhopadhyay, Jatileshwar Mukhopadhyay, Akhil Bandhu Ghosh, Dwijen Mukhopadhyay, Satinath Mukhopadhyay, Sandhya Mukhopadhyay, Pratima Bandyopadhyay, Nirmala Mishra, Salil Chowdhury, Gouriprasanna Majumdar, Pulak Bandyopadhyay, and several others.

Projected against this galaxy, one particular performer quietly found his own niche with very little fanfare. Yet, I must say from personal recollections- I have been consistently drawn to his astonishingly melodious music, which stood apart for its extraordinary modernity–imbued with gentle jazz- and rock-like undertones, and lyrics that were decades ahead of what came to be recognized as modern music even in the West. His voice was not spectacular- neither base nor baritone, and definitely not marked by any falsettos or vocal razzle-dazzle. Yet, his music is simply marinated in a sound of pure romanticism that is unmistakably gripping to anyone romantically inclined towards fellow man or life itself. Pintu Bhattacharya (1940-2011), PB, whose songs never “caught fire’ in the traditional sense, brought out path-breaking, deceptively simple-sounding music even as I grew from my teenage years to my early 20s, was purely representative, for instance, of my (and my brother’s) late teens when my relatively newly married Didi (older sister) was in her 20s, my Jamaibabu (brother-in-law) in his 30s–and our collective imaginations romanticized walks by the beaches of Digha, the joy of a springtime day, or the poetic imagination relative to a romantic flame. Against the backdrop of a rich and varied musical treasure chest, of which there was much that occupied by mind and heart, there was always a special place reserved in my heart for PB. His Cholo Na Dighar Soikot ChhereEk Tajmahal Goro, Tumi Nirjon Upokule, Jani Prithibi Amay Jabe Bhule, and other numbers are simply indelible in my musical psyche. Of this timeless melodious harvest, I am presenting here a selection of a meager eight–a selection that was difficult enough that several others that equally draw me in had to be left out simply for the reason of the need to conserve space. We must also note that unbeknownst to many, PB was assisted by (or rather collaborated with) some of the major composers and lyricists of the post-renaissance epoch–including such superlative creative figures as Salil Chowdhury, Nachiketa Ghosh, Pulak Bandyopadhyay, Sudhin Dasgupta, Shyamal Gupta and others. I have also appended very short commentaries on each of the eight selections along my translation of each into English.

(1)

আমি চলতে চলতে থেমে গেছি

আমি বলতে বলতে ভুলে গেছি

যে কথা তোমাকে বলবো

আমি সপ্ত সিন্ধু পার হয়ে

গোষ্পদে বাঁধা পরে গেছি

এ ব্যাথা কাহারে বলবো

জানি না

জানি না

জানি না

জানি না

কতদিন, কখন, এমন লগন সে আসবে

দুচোখ ভরে শুধু কাঁদবো

আর বুনে যাবো মুক্ত সোনা l

আমি পান্থ পান্থ সুদুরেরই

আমি ক্লান্ত ক্লান্ত হয়ে গেছি

বলো না কি করে চলবো l

আমি পান্থ পান্থ সুদুরেরই

আমি ক্লান্ত ক্লান্ত হয়ে গেছি

বলো না কি করে চলবো l

কেন যে

কেন যে

কেন যে

কেন যে

এ নয়ন স্বপন মগন হয়ে যে থাকে

দেখেও কিছু যে দেখে না

আর বুঝেও কিছু সে বোঝে না

হেথা অন্তহীন মরু ধূ ধূ

আমি ছোট্ট ছোট্ট কবি শুধু

এ কথা কি করে ভুলবো l

আমি চলতে চলতে থেমে গেছি

আমি বলতে বলতে ভুলে গেছি

যে কথা তোমাকে বলবো l

 

Here is a quintessentially typical Salil Chowdhury (SC) number. During the same period in the mid- to late 1960s, SC was creating music history working with Hemanta Mukhopadhyay and other stalwarts in Bengali and almost simultaneously in the Hindi musical domain. But interestingly, he teamed up with PB for several memorable compositions which broke ground in terms of their innovative dimensions including the generous use of orchestral elements.

Ami Cholte Cholte Theme Gechhi – (Lyricist original Bengali: Salil Chowdhury)

Translation © 2019 MRC

I have often stopped abruptly along my trek

While speaking, I’ve forgotten the words

I wanted to tell you.

Having crossed the seven seas

I have become stuck in a quagmire

To whom would I confess this anguish?

I don’t know

I don’t know

I don’t know

I don’t know

When, at what time, will that moment arrive

That I shall freely weep the tears

Weaving filigrees of pearls and gold.

I am a seeker, a seeker of the faraway

Yet weary, weary am I today

Tell me, tell me how to carry on.

I am a seeker, a seeker of the faraway

Yet weary, weary am I today

Tell me, tell me how to carry on.

Why oh why

Why oh why

Why oh why

Why oh why

These eyes are lost in dreams

They see yet see not

They know yet know not

Here is an arid desert everywhere

And me small, a small little poet

How would I ever forget?

I have often stopped abruptly along my trek

While speaking, I’ve forgotten the words

I wanted to tell you.

(2)

চলো না দীঘার সৈকত ছেড়ে

ঝাউবনে ছায়ায় ছায়ায়

শুরু হোক পথ চলা

শুরু হোক কথা বলা l

চলো না দীঘার সৈকত ছেড়ে

ঝাউবনে ছায়ায় ছায়ায়

শুরু হোক পথ চলা

শুরু হোক কথা বলা l

আজ যে কথা গেছে থেকে

পাহাড় উঁচু মনের আড়ালে

দুজনেই গেছি ঢেকে

আজ যে কথা গেছে থেকে

পাহাড় উঁচু মনের আড়ালে

দুজনেই গেছি ঢেকে

সে কথা বাজুক হৃদয় নূপুরে

বৈশাখী চঞ্চলা

শুরু হোক পথ চলা

শুরু হোক কথা বলা l

এই নির্জনে নিভৃতে

নির্বাক মুখ চোখে চোখ রেখে

গেয়ে গেছে সঙ্গীতে

আজ মন চিনে নিয়ে মনে

যদি নিজের মনকে

তোমার কাছে পাঠাই নির্বাসনে

সে মন হোকনা নিজের অলখে

ঊর্বশী উর্মিলা l

শুরু হোক পথ চলা

শুরু হোক কথা বলা l

চলো না দীঘার সৈকত ছেড়ে

ঝাউবনে ছায়ায় ছায়ায়

শুরু হোক পথ চলা

শুরু হোক কথা বলা l

This may well be one of the most identifiable brand-seller for PB. In a relatively recently independent nation struggling to reach its goals of development and the fight against rampant poverty, malnutrition and absence of infrastructure at all levels after centuries of colonial occupation, where the society was still largely conservative and traditional, this song talks about two paramours wishing to walk hand-in-hand and talk with a free will as they explore the cypress trails leading from the beaches of the Bay of Bengal’s Digha coast.

 

Cholo Na Dighar Shoikot Chhere – (Lyricist original Bengali: Barun Biswas)

Translation © 2019 MRC

Tell you what, let’s leave the beach

And walk Digha’s shadowy cypress trails

Let the journey begin

Let the words flow.

The words which have thus far

Remained unspoken

Mountain-high walls separating our minds

Have kept us obscured

Like the restless Vaishakhi let those words

Tinkle like ankle bells in our hearts

Let the journey begin

Let the words flow.

In these quiet, desolate trails

Wordless minds, eyes meeting eyes

Have sung wordless songs.

Now knowing your mind within mine

What if I send my mind to you on exile

Unbeknownst to us, let that mind

Be its own Urvashi, its own Urmila.

Let the journey begin

Let the words flow.

Come, let us leave the beach

And walk Digha’s shadowy cypress trails

Let the journey begin

Let the words flow.

(3)

এক তাজমহল গড়ো হৃদয়ে
তোমার আমি হারিয়ে গেলে
না থাক যমুনা কাছাকাছি,
ক্ষতি নেই, দুটি চোখে
যমুনা কে ধরো

এক তাজমহল গড়ো হৃদয়ে
তোমার আমি হারিয়ে গেলে l

না থাকুক গায়ে তার চুনি পান্না
তোমার প্রেমের ছোঁয়া রেখে
প্রীতির অলংকারে ঢেকে
তাকে আরো অপরূপা করো

এক তাজমহল গড়ো হৃদয়ে
তোমার আমি হারিয়ে গেলে l

না উঠুক তার পাশে পূর্ণিমা চাঁদ
তোমার প্রাণের আলো জ্বেলে
মনের জ্যোৎস্না টুকু ঢেলে
তাকে আরো অপরূপা করো

এক তাজমহল গড়ো হৃদয়ে
তোমার আমি হারিয়ে গেলে l

 

The Taj Mahal as an emblem of love has occupied Bengali literature for a long time. Here is a song with lyrics by Miltu Ghosh which uses the Taj as a metaphoric memorial for a loved one to remember the loss of her beloved, adorning her mind’s Taj with the jewels and the sweet nectar of her love.

Ek Tajmahal Goro – (Lyricist original Bengali: Miltu Ghosh)

Translation © 2019 MRC

Build a Tajmahal, dear

Inside your heart, if I should be lost.

So what if the Jamuna flows not by it

Capture Jamuna with your loving eyes.

Build a Tajmahal, dear

Inside your heart, if I should be lost.

So what if it is not studded with

Rubies and emeralds

Cover it with your ardor

Enrobe it with the jewels of love

Make it even more beautiful-

Build a Tajmahal, dear

Inside your heart, if I should be lost.

So what if the silvery moon

Rises not in its sky

Light the lamp of your heart

Pour forth the moonlight

Of your mind

(And) make it even more beautiful-

Build a Tajmahal, dear

Inside your heart, if I should be lost.

(4)

সোনা রোদের গান আমার সবুজ পাতার গান

তোকে ছাড়া যে ভালো লাগে না কাটেনা দিনমান

সোনা রোদের গান আমার সবুজ পাতার গান l

দূরে দূরে রাখালিয়া বাঁশিতে সুর যখন দুলে

যায়, শুনে শুনে দীঘির ঘাটে আনমনে কেউ কলসী ভাসায় ল

খুশিতে চমকে দে তার pran

তোকে ছাড়া যে ভালো লাগে না কাটেনা দিনমান

সোনা রোদের গান আমার সবুজ পাতার গান l

বেলাশেষের গান আমার ঘরে ফেরার গান

তুলসীতলার প্রদীপ খানি রয় যে পেতে কান

ছুঁয়ে ছুঁয়ে

আঁধার ঘেরা মধুর মায়া মিষ্টি ঘুমে ছয়

চুপি চুপি

চাঁদের আলোয় ঝরছে হাসি মাটির আঙিনায়

নয়নে স্বপ্ন বয়ে আন

তোকে ছাড়া যে ভালো লাগে না কাটেনা দিনমান

সোনা রোদের গান আমার সবুজ পাতার গান l

 

Here is a song which bespeaks simple pastoral life, welcoming the arrival of spring, the filling of water pitchers by the village ponds by young maidens, he beauty of the tulasi alcoves in every courtyard where evening prayers are offered. And through it all, there is a sense of longing.

Shona Roder Gaan Amar Shobuj Patar Gaan – (Lyricist original Bengali: Shyamal Gupta)

Translation © 2019 MRC

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves

Without you, my days are forlorn and wearisome.

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves

Far away, where melodies float atop the shepherd’s flute

And absent-minded a maiden dips her pitcher in the lake-

Startle her heart, fill it with delight

Without you, my days are forlorn and wearisome

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves.

My song of eventide, my song of homecoming

The little oil lamp by the tulasi alcove awake, alert-

In the softness of the night sweet sleep spreads its shawl

Secretly, the moonbeams pour laughter upon earth’s courtyard.

Usher magical dreams to mine eyes

Without you, my days are forlorn and wearisome

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves.

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves

Without you, my days are forlorn and wearisome.

My song of the golden sun, song of the new leaves.

(5)

তুমি নির্জন উপকূলে নায়িকার মতো

পথ চলতে গিয়ে, কিছু বলতে গিয়ে

ঢেকে মিষ্টি দুচোখ হলে লজ্জানত l

সাগরের পার থেকে নাম না জানা

পাখির সুরে

আহা হৃদয় জুড়ে

একটু একটু খুশি পদ্মপাতার

মতো স্বপ্ন রত l

যেমন ওপার থেকে

সাগরের রূপ চেনা যায় না

তেমনি দূরের হয়ে তোমার কাছের

হওয়া যায় না l

তোমার বুকের গান মুগ্ধ

হয়ে ঘেরে কণ্ঠটিরে

আহা সাগর তীরে

একটু একটু খুশি তোমার ফাগুন

হয়ে ছন্দ রত l

 

To this commentator, this song has long epitomized the soft and mellow roundedness of PB’s romantic numbers. Its use of the flute (reminiscent of the Krishna-Radha lore) and its theme of the unreachability of two hearts drawn to one another is simply universal.

Tumi Nirjon Upokule Naikar Moto – (Lyricist original Bengali: Sudhin Dasgupta)

Translation © 2019 MRC

You are like a starlet on a desolate beachfront

As you walk the path, wishing to say a word-

You cover your pretty eyes from bashfulness.

From across the seas

Melodies float in of unknown birdsongs

Gladdening the heart

Little bits of gladness

Like glistening dewdrops on lotus petals.

Planted on the other coast

The beauty of the sea is not revealed-

Much the same, one cannot get close to you

From afar.

The songs that arise from within you

Surround your musical voice

As if by the seacoast

Little bits of gladness

In rhythmic beats heralding your springtime.

(6)

জানি না কখন যে সে কিছু কিছু পিছুটান রেখে গেছে,
আমারই সমুখে পথ থেমে যায়, স্মৃতি তার ঢেকে আছে ।।

তখন থেকেই হৃদয়ের পল্লবে
চৈতালী এসে ধরা দেয় অনুভবে
কেন বুঝি না যে এ কি দ্বিধা লাগে মন লাগে না যে কাজে ।।

এ মনে কথা যত কেন ছিল সংযত
যখন পেলাম সময়ের পথ ধরে
দুটি চোখ থেকে যদিও সে গেছে সরে ।।
চিনে বা না চিনে নিয়ে গেছে কিনে
বেঁধে গেছে ঋণে ঋণে।।

জানি না কখন যে সে কিছু কিছু পিছুটান রেখে গেছে,
আমারই সমুখে পথ থেমে যায়, স্মৃতি তার ঢেকে আছে ।।

 

Here again is a song of pining inside a forlorn heart, which harkens back to one he has fancied after only a brief encounter, and thereafter his days go by remembering the encounter in a variety of circumstances wherein the loved one exists only in his fantasy.

Jani Na Kokhon Je Shey Kichhu Kichhu Pichhutan – (Lyricist original Bengali: Miltu Ghosh)

Translation © 2019 MRC

I know not when she left pieces of longings behind

The path before me ends, yet it is covered with memories.

Therefrom in the petals of my heart

The gentle chaitali breezes fill my senses

Why I know not, why this distraction, my mind drifts from work.

The words inexplicably lay supine within my mind

And when I found my way along the pathway of time

She had disappeared from mine eyes.

Whether she knew it or not, she stole my heart

Yet left me tangled in her debt.

I know not when she left pieces of longings behind

The path before me ends, yet it is covered with memories.

(7)

জানি পৃথিবী আমায় যাবে ভুলে ,
এত সাধ আশা , এত ভালোবাসা , হারালে জীবন নদী কূলে।
জানি পৃথিবী আমায় যাবে ভুলে ।।

তবু যা পেয়েছি স্নেহ মায়া তারি – কি করে আমি তা ভুলে যেতে পারি (2)
মনেরি মাধুরী মিশায়ে স্মৃতিটি রেখে যাবো ফুলে ফুলে,
এত সাধ আশা এত ভালোবাসা , হারালে জীবন নদী কুলে ,
জানি পৃথিবী আমায় যাবে ভুলে ।।

আমার চোখেরই আলো যেন তারা হয়ে জ্বলে ,
হাওয়ায় নিশ্বাস আমার সেদিন আমি নেই যেন না বলে
আকাশে আমারই হৃদয়ের লেখা রঙেরই তুলিতে যেন টানে রেখা
সাগরে আমারই রাগিনী দোলে গো সুরে সুরে ঢ়েউ তুলে

এত সাধ আশা এত ভালোবাসা , হারালে জীবন নদী কুলে ।
জানি পৃথিবী আমায় যাবে ভুলে ।।

 

The next selection admits to the reality of mortality, and that death fairly terminates every last identifiable marker of a life. Yet, one reality enamored with life expresses gratitude for all of life’s gifts, and wishes to his signature upon the living and non-living elements of creation.

Jani Prithibi Amay Jabe Bhule – (Lyricist original Bengali: Shyamal Gupta)

Translation © 2019 MRC

I know the earth will forget me

All hopes and longings, lost at the shoreline of life’s river.

I know the earth will forget me

Yet what I have received, how would I forget the affection and tenderness

Mixing the memories in my mind’s sweet nectar leave them to the flowers.

All hopes and longings, lost at the shoreline of life’s river.

I know the earth will forget me

May the light of my eyes burn like a star

May my breath scattered in the winds never proclaim I am not.

May the fine calligraphy of my heart be writ upon the sky with a paintbrush

And know that my ragini sways in the sea upon waves of melodies.

All hopes and longings, lost at the shoreline of life’s river.

I know the earth will forget me

(8)

ওগো আমার কুন্তলিনী প্রিয়ে

এই মন অন্তর গিয়েছো নিয়ে

শূন্য ঘরে বলো থাকি কি নিয়ে?

(হায়) কি যে করি তা জানি না

মন যে কিছুতে মানে না

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

ওগো আমার কুন্তলিনী প্রিয়ে ল

নিঃঝুম নিশুতি এই রজনী

আর যেন কাটে না গো সজনী

নিঃঝুম নিশুতি এই রজনী

আর যেন কাটে না গো সজনী

তারা ভরা ওই আকাশ কাঁদে

দুটি তারা তোমার আঁখির অভাব নিয়ে

কি যে করি তা জানি না

মন যে কিছুতে মানে না

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

ওগো আমার কুন্তলিনী প্রিয়ে l

সঙ্গিনী মোর প্রতিটি স্বপনে

এসেছো কত না সঙ্গোপনে

সঙ্গিনী মোর প্রতিটি স্বপনে

এসেছো কত না সঙ্গোপনে

যা কিছু ছুঁয়েছ তারে করেছো সোনা

ভালোবেসে রঙে রসে ভরিয়ে দিয়ে l

কি যে করি তা জানি না

মন যে কিছুতে মানে না

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

কন্যা গো সান্ত্বনার কিছু তো যাও দিয়ে

ওগো আমার কুন্তলিনী প্রিয়ে l

 

Here is another number representing PB’s collaboration with the incomparable SC. This song has a rhythmic beat very representative of SC’s orchestral usage. We note that SC later used this composition for another number in Hindi (which was not performed by PB).

Ogo Amar Kuntalini Priye (Lyricist original Bengali: Salil Chowdhury)

Translation © 2019 MRC

Dear wavy-haired beautiful one

Did you know you stole my mind and heart-

Tell me, how would I spend my lonesome time?

Alas- what must I do, I know not

My mind, alas, is so distraught

O girl, please console me a bit

O girl, please console me a bit

Here in this dead and desolate night

Dearest, my dreary time seems interminable

That sky above, studded with a million stars

Weeps bitter tears missing your two starry eyes.

Alas- what must I do, I know not

My mind, alas, is so distraught

O girl, please console me a bit

O girl, please console me a bit

Beloved, in my every dream

Stealthily you have arrived

Anything you have touched has turned to gold

Filling all with the color and nectar of your love

Alas- what must I do, I know not

My mind, alas, is so distraught

O girl, please console me a bit

O girl, please console me a bit 

Monish R. Chatterjee received the B.Tech. (Hons) degree in Electronics and Communications Engineering from I.I.T., Kharagpur, India, in 1979, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering, from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, in 1981 and 1985, respectively. Dr. Chatterjee was a faculty member in Electrical and Computer Engineering at SUNY Binghamton from 1986 through 2002. Dr. Chatterjee is currently with the ECE department at the University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Chatterjee, who specializes in applied optics, has contributed more than 100 papers to technical conferences, and has published more than 70 papers in archival journals and conference proceedings, in addition to numerous reference articles on science. Dr. Chatterjee’s most recent literary essays appear in Rabindranath Tagore: Universality and Tradition, published by FDU Press (2004); Celebrating Tagore, published by Allied Publishers (2009); and Tagore: A Timeless Mind by ICCR and the London Tagore Society (2012). He is the author of four books of translation (Kamalakanta, Profiles in Faith, Balika Badhu and Seasons of Life) from his native Bengali. In 2000, Dr. Chatterjee received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. In 2005, Dr. Chatterjee received a Humanities Fellows award from the University of Dayton to conduct research on scientific language. He is a Senior Member of IEEE, OSA, and SPIE and a member of ASEE and Sigma Xi.


SUPPORT HONEST JOURNALISM

Join Our News Letter


 

Comments are closed.