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1) Democracies often behave like little children: reluctant to take their medicine—unless irrationally coerced.

2) A democracy’s great weakness is its vanity. The people’s vanity. A mortally dangerous tendency that is constantly in need of assurances that it is the world that is at fault rather than it.

3) In a democracy, it is often the most unpopular president or leader who sees the furthest.

4) In a democracy a popular president may be a most pleasantly treacherous saboteur of a republic’s entire future.

5) Under the guise of celebrating difference, a democracy may be unknowingly laboring to create the very instruments for the future abolition of all difference.

6) When the concept of “citizenship’ becomes or appears insufficient, a republic will soon succumb to a quicksand of poorer, less satisfying substitutions.

7) If the primary function or sole purpose of a democratic republic begins to be seen as wholly economic rather than political—then the path towards ever greater examples of demagogy, oligarchy, and the replacement of secure freedoms with administrative blandishments is already assured.

8) Any democratic people entirely focused on the economic girth of their lives scorning the risks ‘of living thinly’ in freedom …will soon lose the ability to choose either path.

9) Historically any kind of freedom for the individual has been extremely hard to obtain, in a high-tech administrative future it might be doubly hard to regain if lost.

10) If a people love their freedom above all else: not much else needs to be done. They will soon flourish.

Dan Corjescu has a PhD in Continental Philosophy from Sofia University. Teaches at Ravensburg-Weinburg and Neu Ulm University of Applied Sciences.


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