Articles by: Andrea Mazzarino

(Un)Civil War?

(Un)Civil War?

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid’s shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back. A neighbor of mine found[Read More…]

by September 23, 2020 World
The Military Is Sick

The Military Is Sick

A Navy Spouse’s Take on Why We’re Not Getting Better American military personnel are getting sick in significant numbers in the midst of the ongoing pandemic. As The New York Times reported in a piece buried in the back pages of its July 21st edition, “The infection rate in the services has tripled over the past six weeks as the United States military has[Read More…]

by August 4, 2020 World
 The War Zone Is America

 The War Zone Is America

Recently, in this Black Lives Matter protest moment, my five-year-old son looked at me and asked, “Mommy, where did all the brown people go? Did the police here shoot them?” We’d just moved to the outskirts of a more affluent rural town from a city where my son and three-and-a-half-year-old daughter mixed daily with black, Latino, and Asian American kids[Read More…]

by June 22, 2020 World
 Who Is “Essential” to Our Covid-19 World

 Who Is “Essential” to Our Covid-19 World

A Military Spouse’s Perspective on Fighting This Pandemic “When he first came home, it was tough.” So Aleha, the wife of an airman in Colorado, told me. She was describing her family’s life since her husband, who lives with chronic depression, completed a partial hospitalization program and, in March, along with other members of his unit, entered a pandemic lockdown. He[Read More…]

by May 14, 2020 World
What Americans Don’t Know About Military Families

What Americans Don’t Know About Military Families

  As each of my husband’s Navy submarine deployments came to an end, local spouses would e-mail me about the ship’s uncertain date of return. They were attempting to sell tickets to a raffle in which the winner would be the first to kiss her returning sailor. When the time came, journalists would hover to capture the image as hundreds[Read More…]

by March 23, 2020 World
Women and Trauma in the Trump-Putin Era

Women and Trauma in the Trump-Putin Era

Last month, as hundreds of thousands of people showed up for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., a few miles from my home, I was at a karate dojo testing for my first belt. My fellow practitioners, ranging in age from five into their seventies, looked on as I hammered my fist through a two-inch piece of wood. The words of one[Read More…]

by February 7, 2020 Patriarchy
A young survivor of August 9 Saudi-led attack on his school bus, with fragment of U.S. made missile - Photo/Ahmad Algohbarya

 War on Terror, War on Education

One day in October 2001, shortly after the U.S. invaded Afghanistan, I stood at the front of a private high school classroom. As a new social studies teacher, I had been tasked with describing violence against women in that country. I showed the students an article from the front page of the New York Times featuring Afghan women casting off their burqas as[Read More…]

by December 20, 2019 World
 Bearing Witness to the Costs of War

 Bearing Witness to the Costs of War

There is some incongruity between my role as an editor of a book about the costs of America’s wars and my identity as a military spouse. I’m deeply disturbed at the scale of human suffering caused by those conflicts and yet I’ve unintentionally contributed to the war effort through the life I’ve chosen. I am the co-editor with Catherine Lutz[Read More…]

by November 25, 2019 Imperialism