I remember on MA tv news watching a white man getting arrested in my state by police for verbally harassing a black couple on a motorcycle in his neighborhood. It was considered a hate crime.

I recall my black friend leading a peaceful protest outside of an MA library against NH white supremacists together in a meeting there. Library administration there started blocking the group from being there in a meeting.

One of our MA sports Icons drove 15 hours to GA to join a protest there where he grew up as a child. How not?

I started stopping racism when I was five years old — the same year that I also tried to help Hiroshima Maidens. It is simply intolerable. Enough!

I have tried throughout my entire life to live peacefully. Yet I can understand the riots in the USA about George Floyd. We are all fed up!

Floyd’s final words are below. They read like some sick sort of poem — a poem from Hell.

“It’s my face man
I didn’t do nothing serious man
please
please
please I can’t breathe
please man
please somebody
please man
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
please
(inaudible)
man can’t breathe, my face
just get up
I can’t breathe
please (inaudible)
I can’t breathe sh*t
I will
I can’t move
mama
mama
I can’t
my knee
my nuts
I’m through
I’m through
I’m claustrophobic
my stomach hurt
my neck hurts
everything hurts
some water or something
please
please
I can’t breathe officer
don’t kill me
they gon’ kill me man
come on man
I cannot breathe
I cannot breathe
they gon’ kill me
they gon’ kill me
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
please sir
please
please
please I can’t breathe”

I’m sorry for you if you are a racist. The rest of us just can’t take your stance anymore.

Sally Dugman writes from MA, USA.


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3 Comments

  1. Avatar Gary Corseri says:

    This could be called a “found poem.” Whatever one calls it, we are indebted to Sally Dugan for highlighting George Floyd’s poignant final words in such a powerful format. The poem itself is fine; we really don’t need editorializing and virtue-signaling like this: “Yet I can understand the riots in the USA about George Floyd. We are all fed up!” In fact, many people are “fed up” with unbalanced news reporting and an educational system that is more about indoctrination than education. Let’s not soft-petal the rioting. Most of it is hurting the very people the rioters are supposed to be rioting for–those who live, or would have lived, in “affordable housing developments downtown; or black merchants investing lifetime savings in a “sports-bar,” etc. “Cultural violence” has been a reality in the U.S., and indeed, in the world, for centuries. The way that violence works is seldom scrutinized. Let’s remember Socrates’ advice: “The unexamined life is not worth living.”

  2. Avatar countercurrents says:

    Dr T.T Sreekumar writes
    “Here is a Bangladeshi Restaurant owner Ruhel who has named his shop “Gandhi Mahal”, putting together the surname of the torch bearer of non violence, MK Gandhi and the Persian word Mahal (meaning a shopping place, etymologically speaking) and whose shop was damaged due to the violence that erupted in Minneapolis setting ablaze a police station nearby, following the brutal murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis cops.
    He is probably a Gandhian, but apparently was not worried about the violence or even selfishly about his own loss, but about justice. He said- ‘let my building burn, justice needs to be served, put those officers in jail’.”
    We live in a complicated world of hope, optimism and trust amidst the brutalities of imperialism, racism, castism and capitalism. People like Ruhel are no ideologues perhaps, but know exactly what’s right and what’s wrong, both intuitively and instinctively. He did not serve a sermon of non violence in a salver, or lamented his loss, instead pushed the cause of justice and solidarity a notch further.
    Saluting him, along with the whole humanity.”

    • Avatar Gary Corseri says:

      Thank you for this note on Ruhel. I salute him, and other brave souls who have “pushed the cause of justice and solidarity a notch further.” (Gandhi and Martin Luther King have been heroes of mine since my teens!) Let us also be very clear about our arguments in favor of one approach or another (Socrates is another hero!). Let’s try to avoid logical fallacies like “ad hominem arguments,” “glittering generalities,” “poisoning the well,” “argumentum ad absurdum” and reductionism. Clear thinking and analysis is in short supply in these days of unsocial “social media.”